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"No, We Straight": Obama Racially Bilingual

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"No, We Straight": Obama Racially Bilingual

Race

"No, We Straight": Obama Racially Bilingual

"No, We Straight": Obama Racially Bilingual

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101661518/101661512" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In January, then President-elect Barack Obama visited Ben's Chili Bowl in Washington, D.C. When the cashier asked him if he wanted his change, he replied "Nah, we straight."

Dawn Turner Trice, columnist for the Chicago Tribune, explores how politicians use coded language to connect with different groups. She writes that Obama has "an exceptionally good ear" for speaking to different groups and "having almost everybody walk way feeling like Obama has said something directly to him or her."