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Stricter Rules Coming for Vehicle Emissions
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Stricter Rules Coming for Vehicle Emissions

Environment

Stricter Rules Coming for Vehicle Emissions

Stricter Rules Coming for Vehicle Emissions
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President Bush says he'll create rules by the end of next year, mandating fuel efficiency and the use of alternative fuels. The burden will mostly fall on auto makers to build more efficient cars, and on gasoline refiners to include ethanol in their products. But consumers will feel the pinch too in the higher costs of both cars and gas.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with stricter rules on vehicle emissions.

INSKEEP: President Bush announced yesterday he will create new rules by the end of next year. They will mandate fuel efficiency and the use of alternative fuels. The burden will mostly fall on automakers to build more efficient cars and gasoline refiners to include ethanol in their products. But consumers will feel the pinch too, in higher costs for both cars and gas.

Now, in the past the president has pledged to cut fuel consumption by 20 percent over the next decade, but automakers say they cannot survive tighter fuel efficiency requirements and they are likely to contest the new rules in court.

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