NPR logo

Companies Drop Cash on Dream to Fly Into Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10192776/10192779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Companies Drop Cash on Dream to Fly Into Space

Space

Companies Drop Cash on Dream to Fly Into Space

Companies Drop Cash on Dream to Fly Into Space

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10192776/10192779" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Rocketplane mock-up i

A Rocketplane mock-up sits in a hangar at Burns Flat, Okla. Frank Morris hide caption

toggle caption Frank Morris
Rocketplane mock-up

A Rocketplane mock-up sits in a hangar at Burns Flat, Okla.

Frank Morris

A handful of companies are vying to be the first to take paying tourists for brief rides to the edge of space.

Some, like Virgin Galactic, have built sleek spaceships for the task.

But a company in Oklahoma is trying to get into the game with an old Lear Jet that has been fitted with an Atlas rocket engine.

Although it's unclear when — or if — the design will fly, customers are already buying enormously expensive tickets to ride the Rocketplane. Frank Morris of member station KCUR reports.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.