Mexican Drug War Creeps Into U.S. Border Towns

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A drug war is raging across the border. Over 6,000 people were killed in drug-related violence in Mexico last year.

The body count is mounting, and the violence is spilling into the United States.

Tony Cox explores how U.S. officials are addressing the growing crisis. Plus, how can travelers stay out of danger?

Cox speaks with Andrew Becker — a staff writer for the Center for Investigative Reporting — and Ken Ellingwood, a correspondent in the Mexico City bureau of the Los Angeles Times and the author of Hard Line: Life and Death on the U.S.-Mexico Border.

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Hard Line

Life and Death on the U.S.-Mexico Border

by Ken Ellingwood

Hardcover, 256 pages |


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Life and Death on the U.S.-Mexico Border
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