Responding To Your Letters

NPR's Tony Cox and News & Notes editor Sasa Woodruff read and respond to listeners' e-mails about the end of the program. Tomorrow marks the broadcast's final day on the air.

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TONY COX, host:

And now, we turn to our editor Sasa Woodruff for our final letters segment. Hey, Sasa.

SASA WOODRUFF: Hey, Tony. How's it going?

COX: Well, you know. So we're wrapping up our listener comments segment today. What have you got?

WOODRUFF: Well, you know, since National Public Radio announced in December that they were canceling News & Notes, listeners started flooding our inbox. We got lots of letters about people asking how the show could be saved. They also told us what they would miss. And it was really amazing because sometimes, you know, looking for the letters, we didn't get a lot. So, these have been really consistent. So, I went through and I took a sampling of those letters and had some of our staff read the sendoff. Let's take a listen.

SONATA LEE NARCISSE: Tiffany Smith(ph) in Atlanta, Georgia. (Reading) I'm a dedicated listener and find your programming thought-provoking, entertaining and inspiring. You all have truly managed to take radio to a higher level. My evening commute will not be same.

JEFFREY BENNETT: John Madison(ph) in Turlock, California. (Reading) Thanks for the intriguing and insightful commentary and reporting over the past few years. I was introduced to News & Notes on KUOP out of Sacramento. After the show was lost there, I began following via podcast, and greatly appreciate your candor and confidence in presenting stories and points of view absent in most other venues.

DEVIN ROBBINS: Jane Grace Bowman(ph) in Rogers, Arkansas. (Reading) I'm a Caucasian female and I love your show. I've been listening to News & Notes several times a week for the last two years. It's important to me to get a new and broader perspective on news that affects communities other than mine. Thank you for bringing me closer.

ROY HURST: Larry Lobertie(ph) in Holland, Pennsylvania. (Reading) Your perspective is one that has given me insights not found anywhere else in such a thoughtful and sensitive manner. Your coverage of the election was superb. I will miss you and your staff.

CHRISTABEL NSIAH-BUADI: Crystal Smith Maya(ph) in Patton, Pennsylvania. (Reading) What a treat to discover News & Notes. Your show has alternately enlightened, inspired and saddened me. I've learned much about my race and yours, about how we interact today and the potential for a multicultural America, in which respect for our individual uniqueness is seen as something to celebrate. You have brought a fresh voice that does not attempt to divide but rather, educate.

NICOLE CHILDERS: Candice Frances(ph). (Reading) I can hear the sadness of your parting come through the airwaves. Even as you deliver the final shows with consummate professionalism, you've represented well even when I didn't agree with the guest or questioned the need, production or execution of a segment. Surely you've educated many of us about all sorts of topics but most importantly, you've provided a nuanced view of what it means to be black in America. We don't live in a postracial nation, despite the election of President Obama. Thank you for satiating my appetite for News & Notes about us. All the best to each of you on staff.

WOODRUFF: Thanks to News & Notes staffers Sonata Lee Narcisse, Jeffrey Bennett, Devin Robbins, Roy Hurst, Christabel Nsiah-Buadi and Nicole Childers for reading those letters.

COX: And many thanks to all of you for supporting News & Notes over the years. And thank you, Sasa.

WOODRUFF: Thanks, Tony. It's been fun. ..TEXT: (Soundbite of music)

COX: That's our show for today. Glad you could join us. To listen to the show, visit our Web site, nprnewsandnotes.org. News & Notes was created by NPR News and the African-American Public Radio consortium.

I'm Tony Cox. This is News & Notes.

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