Sign Of The Times: Teacher Sells Ad Space On Tests In Pocatello, Idaho, a high school is so short of money, it taped reminders near light switches to save electricity — and now a teacher has sold advertising space on work sheets, handouts and tests. Red lettering offers a one-topping pizza for $5 at a local pizzeria.
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Sign Of The Times: Teacher Sells Ad Space On Tests

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Sign Of The Times: Teacher Sells Ad Space On Tests

Sign Of The Times: Teacher Sells Ad Space On Tests

Sign Of The Times: Teacher Sells Ad Space On Tests

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102372154/102371939" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In Pocatello, Idaho, a high school is so short of money, it taped reminders near light switches to save electricity — and now a teacher has sold advertising space on work sheets, handouts and tests. Red lettering offers a one-topping pizza for $5 at a local pizzeria.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

This lesson in history is brought to you by a pizzeria in Pocatello, Idaho. A local high school is so short of money that they taped signs near light switches to save electricity. Now a teacher has sold advertising on the schoolwork. Every worksheet, handout and test contains red letters advertising a one-topping pizza for five bucks. The principal disliked the idea but says maybe it'll teach kids what it means to be desperate in hard times.

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