Film Composer Maurice Jarre Remembered

Maurice Jarre (300) i i

hide captionMaurice Jarre after receiving an honorary Golden Bear during the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year.

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images Entertainment
Maurice Jarre (300)

Maurice Jarre after receiving an honorary Golden Bear during the Berlin International Film Festival earlier this year.

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images Entertainment

Oscar-winning film composer Maurice Jarre died Sunday. Jarre, best known for writing the music for Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago, was 84.

The French-born composer and conductor wrote music for more than 150 films over the course of the past five decades. Jarre's orchestral scores have been described as majestic, full-bodied, soaring, rich and lyrical.

Jarre won Academy Awards for three of his collaborations with British director David Lean: A Passage to India, Doctor Zhivago and Lawrence of Arabia.

Jarre believed that music should be central to any film, and he wanted to be brought into the production process as early as possible, which didn't happen with Lawrence of Arabia. In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, he said he had just six weeks to compose and record two hours of music. Jarre called it a "real panic time."

Jarre's work continued through the 1980s and '90s, as he wrote music for films as varied as Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome, Gorillas in the Mist, Dead Poets Society and the supernatural drama Ghost.

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