Prozac the Most Widely Used Antidepressant

Prozac, often called the "happy drug," is the most widely used antidepressant in history with 54 million prescriptions. This week, Prozac turns 20. These days, the drug is prescribed for a lot of conditions, ranging from obsessive-compulsive disorder to a mild case of the teenage blues. Even veterinarians prescribe it to panicking parrots, pacing polar bears and destructive dogs.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Maybe money can't buy happiness, but plenty of us try to induce it in other ways, with chocolate or yoga or a medical solution. Today's last word in business is Prozac, often called the happy drug. It's the most widely used antidepressant in history, with 54 million prescriptions.

This week, Prozac celebrates its 20th birthday. These days the drug is prescribed for lots of sad conditions, from obsessive-compulsive disorder to a mild case of the teenage blues. For toddlers, it comes in a liquid mint flavor. Veterinarians prescribe it to panicking parrots, pacing polar bears and destructive dogs. And for pets, the brand-name Prozac can cost more than $100 a month.

INSKEEP: From NPR News, it's MORNING EDITION, feeling happy this morning without medication.

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