Romanian Man Sentenced In 'Phishing' Scam

  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    Embed <iframe src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/102549489/102549460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no">
  • Transcript

A federal judge in Connecticut has sentenced a 23-year-old Romanian man to four years in prison for his involvement in an international "phishing" ring. In this kind of scam, criminals send e-mails luring people to a fake Web site — one that looks similar to a bank's Web page, for example. Unsuspecting Internet users are asked to put in sensitive data — like a credit card number. This is the first foreign defendant convicted in a broad effort to steal from Internet users.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is hooked. A federal judge yesterday sentenced a 23-year-old Romanian man to four years in jail for his involvement in an international phishing ring. We're not talking about salmon fishing. We're talking about the phishing spelled with a ph. It's a kind of scam, if you hadn't heard this, in which criminals send emails luring people to fake Web sites - say, one that looks like your own bank. Unsuspecting Internet users are asked to put in sensitive data - say, like your credit card number.

This is the first time a foreigner has been sentenced for phishing in the U.S. Authorities say this Romanian young man stole hundreds of thousands of dollars, but he's still considered a small fry. According to one estimate, phishing netted more than $3 billion in one recent year alone.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.