Recovering After Wildfires As wildfires continue to burn across the United States, fire experts at opposite ends of the country discuss this year's fire season and whether climate change is a factor. What is the best way to help an ecosystem recover after a fire? Should it be left alone, or replanted?
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Recovering After Wildfires

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Recovering After Wildfires

Recovering After Wildfires

Recovering After Wildfires

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As wildfires continue to burn across the United States, fire experts at opposite ends of the country discuss this year's fire season and whether climate change is a factor. What is the best way to help an ecosystem recover after a fire? Should it be left alone, or replanted?

Jon E. Keeley, adjunct professor, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of California; research scientist, USGS Western Ecological Research Center, Sequoia National Park

Kevin M. Robertson, fire ecology research scientist, Tall Timbers Research Station, Tallahassee, Florida