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Beer, Motorized Barstool Land Man In Trouble

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Beer, Motorized Barstool Land Man In Trouble

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Beer, Motorized Barstool Land Man In Trouble

Beer, Motorized Barstool Land Man In Trouble

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A 28-year-old Ohio man was charged with driving under the influence after he crashed his barstool. The stool was powered by a lawn mower engine. He told police he was going about 20 mph — adding that he had consumed 15 beers. But he told a local TV reporter that he started drinking after the accident.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A 28-year-old Ohio man was charged with driving under the influence after he crashed his barstool. The stool was perched atop a motor from a lawnmower, complete with steering wheel and was going about 20 miles an hour, he told police. Kile Wygle pleaded not guilty, but admitted he had, oh, 15 beers. He told a local TV reporter that he started drinking after he wrecked his bar stool.

And that's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. And it's not an April Fool's joke.

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