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Stevens: Cloud Lifted From Life

Law

Stevens: Cloud Lifted From Life

Update From Nina Totenberg

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Former Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska says a cloud has been removed from his life now that Attorney General Eric Holder has asked a federal court to throw out his corruption conviction. Holder cites misconduct by the prosecution team, which did not turn over exculpatory material to Stevens' defense.

MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

: Attorney General Eric Holder announced the Justice Department is dropping all charges against former U.S. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska. The decision to void Stevens' corruption conviction was first disclosed by NPR early this morning. With more on the story, here's NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.

NINA TOTENBERG: The straw that apparently broke Holder's back was the discovery of more prosecutorial notes that were not turned over to the Stevens defense team as required by law, notes that were discovered by a new prosecution team appointed in February in the wake of charges of misconduct against the old team. Senator Stevens did not appear in public today, but his lawyer Brendan Sullivan did.

NORRIS: We're very grateful to the Attorney General of the United States Eric Holder for the decision that he made today to drop all charges against Senator Stevens. That decision was justified by the extraordinary evidence of government corruption in this case.

TOTENBERG: Richard Mauer is a reporter for the Anchorage Daily News.

NORRIS: That's the big question: What does this do for the ongoing investigation?

TOTENBERG: Nina Totenberg, NPR News, Washington.

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