Prosecuting Cyber Bullies For years, kids who were the victims of bullying and teasing at school or on the playground could find refuge at home. But in the age of new technology, bullying has become a 24-hour problem, with harassers able to taunt and tease their peers through e-mail, text messages and social networks.
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Prosecuting Cyber Bullies

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Prosecuting Cyber Bullies

Law

Prosecuting Cyber Bullies

Prosecuting Cyber Bullies

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For years, kids who were the victims of bullying and teasing at school or on the playground could find refuge at home. But in the age of new technology, bullying has become a 24-hour problem, with harassers able to taunt and tease their peers through e-mail, text messages and social networks.

This "cyber bullying" was the crux of the case surrounding 13-year-old Megan Meier, who hanged herself in 2006 after receiving a series of online insults. A Missouri woman was convicted late last year of misdemeanor computer fraud in the case. She had helped to create a fake MySpace profile of a teenage boy who courted Megan online — then rejected her.

Guest host Linda Wertheimer talks to U.S. Rep. Linda Sanchez of California, who is sponsoring a bill named after Megan that would make it a federal crime to engage in bullying electronically.