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Expert: Earthquakes Hard To Predict

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Expert: Earthquakes Hard To Predict

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Expert: Earthquakes Hard To Predict

Expert: Earthquakes Hard To Predict

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More than 90 people have been killed and over 1,500 other hurt in the deadly earthquake that hit central Italy Monday.

Walter Mooney of the U.S. Geological Survey says though scientists have learned a lot about quakes, they are still unable to predict them with any accuracy.

"Instead of doing short-term predictions, we can do something, which I think is equally valuable, and that is give the long-term probability of an earthquake," Mooney says.