NPR logo
Web-Only Outtake: Alela Diane Performs 'Every Path'
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102827170/102831649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Alela Diane: Campfire Gospel

Alela Diane: Campfire Gospel

Web-Only Outtake: Alela Diane Performs 'Every Path'
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102827170/102831649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Set List

"Dry Grass & Shadows"

"White As Diamonds"

"To Be Still"

Alela Diane in Studio on World Cafe 4/7/09
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102827170/102823269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Alela Diane i

Alela Diane Mariee Sioux Sobonya hide caption

toggle caption Mariee Sioux Sobonya
Alela Diane

Alela Diane

Mariee Sioux Sobonya

With a gentle acoustic style and evocative lyrics, up-and-coming folksinger Alela Diane has developed a devoted following. The Nevada City native was raised on music; her parents frequently held sing-alongs around the dinner table. After wandering in Europe, waitressing tables and finishing a degree, Diane self-released The Pirate's Gospel. Since that time, she's been touring in Europe, performing with The Decemberists, Akron/Family and Vashti Bunyan.

Diane's latest album, To Be Still, blends Americana and psychedelic folk with finger-picked guitar and clear, evocative vocals. Diane's music has been called "campfire gospel" for its hushed meditation on the surrounding world. Her lyrics paint pictures of nature with a rural feel, as Diane draws inevitable comparisons to Joanna Newsom and Gillian Welch.

In a session with host David Dye, Diane discusses how her music reflects her family's background, as well as her surprising popularity in France.

Purchase Featured Music

To Be Still

Purchase Music

Buy Featured Music

Album
To Be Still
Artist
Alela Diane
Label
Fargo
Released
2009

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?

 

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.