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Twitterers Message By Haiku
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Twitterers Message By Haiku

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Twitterers Message By Haiku

Twitterers Message By Haiku
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Twaikuing is turning twitterers into poets in the latest craze of social networking in the form of haikus. Writers can now express their ups and downs in profound rhymes.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Okay. Let's review: brown fat could make you skinny, box offices are getting fat. To tie it all together, super skinny movie reviews.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

We're talking about Twitter - movie reviews under 140 characters. The film Web site Rotten Tomatoes has people tweeting reviews as Haiku. They're given the full production treatment, including interpretive dance. Here's one for "Marley and Me."

Unidentified Woman: Fun movie with dog. Sit down and watch with the fam.

Unidentified Man: Holy crap.

Unidentified Woman #2: Tears. Tears.

SHAPIRO: Movie reviews are just one niche in the burgeoning genre known as Twaiku. Yes, Twitter haiku.

MONTAGNE: Twilight approaches, working keeps me office bound, vacation calling. You can find Haiku news updates, social commentary and every predictions on the future of Twaiku.

SHAPIRO: Yes. Here's one more we found.

(Soundbite of clearing throat)

SHAPIRO: Resolution made. I will Twitter in haiku. Fad may pass for me.

This is NPR News.

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