DriverTV.com Seals the Deal

Most car buyers do some research online before they choose from the 280 different types of cars available in the U.S. But now, thanks to the makers of DriverTV.com, you can do all of your research online before you buy a car, including test drives. The site made its debut last week and features high-definition video clips of new-car models and footage of the car whizzing along a stretch of road. You are guaranteed not to have to leave your chair before you buy.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

There is also a virtual dressing room where you can try on a car. It's the subject of our last word in business today - DriverTV.com.

The site features video footage of new car models whizzing along a stretch of road. The idea is it'll save you from having to test drive the car before buying it. Of course, not everybody agrees that this is the best way to choose a car because you're not guaranteed to like the way it's feels when you actually do drive it, but you are guaranteed not to have to leave your chair before buying.

It's Morning Edition from NPR News, I'm Steven Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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