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Spring 'Mini-Season' Means More TV Options

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Spring 'Mini-Season' Means More TV Options

Pop Culture

Spring 'Mini-Season' Means More TV Options

Spring 'Mini-Season' Means More TV Options

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102981832/103008504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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You Watching? Nah, us either. We give NBC's Merlin a 12-percent shot at success. NBC hide caption

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NBC

On 'Monkey See'

More new shows, and their odds of success:

Springtime means awakenings of all sorts: Baseball fans are back in the stadiums, gardeners are planning their plots — and these days, new TV shows sprout when the daffodils do.

But with more channels, more shows, and more ways to watch, how's a fan to know what to TiVo?

Linda Holmes, who writes about pop culture and entertainment on the NPR blog Monkey See, joins Weekend Edition Sunday for a chat about the good, the bad and the ugly among the season's new shows — and to talk about the ever-increasing number of ways to watch on your own schedule.