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Researchers Unveil Wii Remote Control For Mower

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Researchers Unveil Wii Remote Control For Mower

Business

Researchers Unveil Wii Remote Control For Mower

Researchers Unveil Wii Remote Control For Mower

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103019469/103019503" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Now you can sit back and mow your lawn with a Wii remote controller. Researchers in Denmark call it the Casmobot. It's pretty basic: Tilt the remote forward, the mower drives forward. Tilt it back, the mower goes in in reverse. Researchers used a standard Wii remote controller and Bluetooth technology. One of the researchers says the goal is to make grass cutting more "efficient."

And if you don't feel like riding a battery- or gas-powered mower, you may soon be able to sit back and mow your lawn with a Wii remote controller. Our last word in business is lazy man's lawn mower. Researchers in Denmark recently unveiled it, and it's pretty basic. You tilt the remote forward, the mower drives forward. Tilt it back, the mower goes in reverse. You can program the borders of your lawn and let the mower mow on its own. Researchers used a standard Wii remote controller and Bluetooth technology. One of them says the goal is to make grass-cutting more efficient.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne, and Steve Inskeep will be back with us tomorrow.

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