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Is The Legacy Of 'The New York Times' In Trouble?

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Is The Legacy Of 'The New York Times' In Trouble?

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Is The Legacy Of 'The New York Times' In Trouble?

Is The Legacy Of 'The New York Times' In Trouble?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103134456/103134455" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The New York Times is the most important newspaper in the country and, maybe, the world. It is, writes Mark Bowden in this month's Vanity Fair, the flagship of serious journalism.

No newspaper has won so many prizes or produces such consistently outstanding work. No other journalism Web site comes near its excellence — or its readership. And yet, many of its writers, readers and staunchest supporters wonder if it can survive.

Protecting the Times legacy is a legacy himself — Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. — the fifth in his family to preside as publisher, and the man who, Bowden says, has steered his inheritance into a ditch.

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