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Questions For Ensign Red Shirt

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Questions For Ensign Red Shirt

Pop Culture

Questions For Ensign Red Shirt

Questions For Ensign Red Shirt

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103246128/103246094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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You have to be a true Trekkie to know about a Star Trek character called Lieutenant Leslie. Host Scott Simon asks our listeners for questions for an upcoming interview with actor Eddie Paskey — who was William Shatner's stand-in on the show.

(Soundbite of "Star Trek" theme music)

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Space, the final frontier. You don't have to be a "Star Trek" fan to recognize that old opening, which preceded the voyages of the Starship Enterprise, had a valiant crew: Kirk, Spock, Bones, McCoy and Leslie. Leslie? You'd have to be true Trekkie to know that a character called Lieutenant Leslie appeared in 40 of the 79 original "Star Trek" episodes. Now, those unschooled in dilithium crystals and photon torpedoes are forgiven for never having heard of Mr. Leslie or the actor who played him, Eddie Paskey.

Eddie Paskey was also William Shatner's stand-in. When he wasn't filling in Captain Kirk's stage position as scenes were being set up, he often had a minor role as Lieutenant Leslie, who seemed to have jobs just all over the Enterprise. The new "Star Trek" feature film opening soon, we've asked Eddie Paskey to join us in a couple of weeks on WEEKEND EDITION. We've got questions, of course, but we'll get him to answer some of yours, too.

Just go to your blog, npr.org/soapbox and submit your questions. But be warned Trekkies, he's an actor, not a physicist, okay? We doubt that he knows the Heisenberg compensators work.

(Soundbite of "Star Trek" theme music)

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