Redefining GOP Is No Tea Party The recent demonstrations protesting federal spending and higher taxes come at a moment when the Republican Party is looking to redefine itself — and the question remains whether taxes and spending are issues that can reunite and reinvigorate the party.
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Redefining GOP Is No Tea Party

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Redefining GOP Is No Tea Party

Redefining GOP Is No Tea Party

Redefining GOP Is No Tea Party

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103257408/103257383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This week, conservatives all across the country staged so-called "tea parties" to protest federal spending and higher taxes.

The demonstrations come at a moment when the Republican Party is looking to redefine itself — and the question remains whether taxes and spending are issues that can reunite and reinvigorate the party.

Guest Host Linda Wertheimer talks about the future of the GOP with Reihan Salam, a fellow at the New America Foundation and author of Grand New Party, and Michelle Laxalt, a political consultant who has worked for Republican senators and the Reagan administration.