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Drug Smugglers Turning To Homemade Submarines

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Drug Smugglers Turning To Homemade Submarines

World

Drug Smugglers Turning To Homemade Submarines

Drug Smugglers Turning To Homemade Submarines

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103490776/103490759" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A U.S. Coast Guard cutter off Costa Rica saw a strange disturbance just below the ocean surface in 2006: three snorkels poking out of the water, and no diver's flag.

As they got closer, the disturbance was revealed to be a homemade submarine, made in the jungles of Colombia. It was carrying three tons of cocaine to the United States.

These homemade submarines have been dubbed "semi-subs," and they've become more than just a nuisance in the international drug trade.

Host Scott Simon speaks with David Kushner, who wrote an article about the semi-subs appearing in the Sunday's New York Times Magazine.