Your Letters: Roxana Saberi, Sudan

Many listeners sent in comments after we broke the news that American journalist Roxana Saberi had been sentenced by Iran's Revolutionary Court to eight years in prison on a charge of espionage. There were also harsh words directed at us after a report last week on an uneasy peace between warring factions in North and South Sudan.

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

And we begin your Letters with a correction. Last week during our Week in Review segment, we discussed a report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety in crash test for small cars. We said the results were based on test collisions between small cars and SUVs. In fact, the test involved collisions between a small car and a midsize model from the same manufacturer.

Many listeners sent in comments after we broke the news that American journalist Roxana Saberi had been sentenced by Iran's Revolutionary Court to eight years in prison for espionage.

David Copeland of Mesquite, Nevada, had a sharp message for the judges: I was impressed by the manliness exhibited by Iranian judges who threatened, jailed, and convicted Roxana Saberi. They aren't worried that they may look like half men or cowards who brought the full force of the state against an innocent young female reporter. How brave of them to bring into question the courage of all Iranians in power, who sit by and idly watch such an abuse of power like spectators at a rape.

But Rory Fuchs(ph) of Twin Brook, Connecticut, wrote, I'm sympathetic with Roxana Saberi and her family at the personal level. Yet, at the institutional level, I have to wonder whether her situation was not predictable. Is it not possible that her treatment by the Iranian government may be in part a response to George Bush's policy of imprisoning those he deemed enemies?

Also some harsh words directed at us after a report last week on an uneasy piece between warring factions in north and south Sudan.

Ann Berthoff(ph) of Austin, Texas, wrote, Gwen Thompkins' report on Saturday morning adopted an irreverent hip, cynical tone that was inappropriate, in my opinion, and disquieting. The report used informal language: in the crapper, the general was goosed, the city was not much to fight over, for example. And her tone of voice was sharp and disrespectful, apparently designed to direct attention to the cleverness of the reporter and not the content of the report. This tragic corner of the word deserves, at the very least, the respect of those whose expertise could provide helpful insight.

We welcome your comments. You can go to npr.org and click on the Contact Us link. You can also write me directly on Twitter at nprscottsimon, all one word. You can also use Twitter to reach our editors and producers at nprweekend, all one word.

And a reminder, we're still taking questions for our upcoming interview with actor, Eddie Paskey. That was William Shatner's stand-in during the original "Star Trek" series and often portrayed little known Lieutenant Leslie on the USS Enterprise.

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SIMON: You can submit your questions on our blog, npr.org/soapbox. Sorry Trekkies, messages submitted by subspace radio just cannot be accepted.

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