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Reporter Scott Shane On 'Torture Memo' News
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Reporter Scott Shane On 'Torture Memo' News

U.S.

Reporter Scott Shane On 'Torture Memo' News

Reporter Scott Shane On 'Torture Memo' News
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Newly declassified documents — they've quickly become known as the "torture memos" — have renewed questions about how American security services treated terrorism suspects during the George W. Bush administration. The memos, written in 2002 and 2005, reveal among other things that two captured al-Qaeda operatives were subjected to waterboarding a total of 266 times.

New York Times reporter Scott Shane covers national-security issues from the newspaper's Washington bureau. He's been covering the release of the torture memos, and he talks to Fresh Air host Terry Gross about what the documents reveal — and what the fallout may be.

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