Sparks Wins 'American Idol' Title

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Jordin Sparks is the latest American Idol winner. The show's continuing popularity is reflected in the more than 609 million votes cast over the course of the TV season for various candidates on the musical talent show.

(Soundbite of TV show "American Idol")

Ms. JORDIN SPARKS (Winner, "American Idol"): Lend me your ears and I'll sing you a song and I'll try not to sing out of key. Oh, I get by with a little help from my friends…

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Of course, singing in key is the idea behind "American Idol," usually. This is the talent contest that picks wannabe rock stars around the country for a season of song and dance and heartbreak. Last night, the sixth season finale was no exception when judges tallied more than 74 million votes in favor of the newest idol.

(Soundbite of TV show "American Idol")

Mr. RYAN SEACREST (Host, "American Idol"): The winner of "American Idol 2007" is - Jordin Sparks.

(Soundbite of applause)

INSKEEP: Getting by, with the help of 74 million friends. In total, there were more than 609 million votes tallied this season - 609 million votes. That is, we must note, almost 10 times as many votes as our president received in the last election, although we should mention that "American Idol" participants get to vote more than once. There are not 609 million Americans.

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