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Hobbit's Big Feet Offer Clues To Its Origin

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Hobbit's Big Feet Offer Clues To Its Origin

Research News

Hobbit's Big Feet Offer Clues To Its Origin

Hobbit's Big Feet Offer Clues To Its Origin

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/103934329/103934318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Homo floresiensis, the mysterious hominid uncovered on the Indonesian island of Flores in 2003, continues to raise questions about human evolution. Ira Flatow and anthropologists discuss two new studies in Nature that support the idea that the "hobbit" fossils represent a new species.

Guests:

William L. Jungers , professor and chairman, Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY

Daniel E. Lieberman, professor, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.