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Letters: Infertility, Customer Service, and Grads

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Letters: Infertility, Customer Service, and Grads

From Our Listeners

Letters: Infertility, Customer Service, and Grads

Letters: Infertility, Customer Service, and Grads

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10395122/10395123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Siegel reads from listeners' letters and e-mails. We hear feedback about our interview on infertility treatments, thoughts on customer service, and a response to one professor's effort to correctly pronounce names at graduation.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

And Thursday is the day we read from your email and we received lots of feedback about Michele Norris' interview with Liza Mundy. She's the author of a book about infertility treatments. It's called "Everything Conceivable."

Well, Marcia Palkovich(ph) of Flint, Michigan writes: It was refreshing to finally hear someone discussing the issue of premature and multiple births with complete candor. I've taught such children for 26 years and have never worked with a child born under two pounds who has not had some kind of physical or cognitive issue. Thank you, Miss Mundy, for being the voice of reality.

Well, listener Kate Soa(ph) was unhappy with that discussion. Please be careful, she writes, when you talk about infertility in such general and unforgiving terms. Your story made infertile couples sound like crazed baby-hungry lunatics. No one enters into these procedures lightly. Miss Mundy's attitude seems very judgmental and simplified.

In our story about Washington State's law banning text messaging while driving, reporter Chana Joffe-walt and author Linda Stone hit the road to find some violators.

(Soundbite of archived ALL THINGS CONSIDERED broadcast)

Ms. LINDA STONE (Resident, Seattle, Washington): She's text-messaging - she's doing email. Oh, my gosh. She is so not eyes on the road. She is so eyes on her BlackBerry.

SIEGEL: Well, Chris Dodson(ph) from Gilbert, Arizona had this response. He writes: I have to smile at the irony of Linda Stone driving through traffic looking for other people not paying attention to the road. I would like to ask Miss Stone where her eyes were when she said of the driver next to her, she is so not eyes on the road.

Well, Adam Nailer(ph) of Tampa, Florida writes in with this critique of our stories about bad customer service. You missed the point, he tells us, everyday, consumers choose price over service. More extensive training, lower turnover, more motivated employees all cost time and money - this translates to higher prices for the customer. If service is truly more important to the consumer than marginal differences in price, they should spend their money where the service is better.

Well, some listeners were impressed by the service Rose Marie Bebee gives graduates at Santa Clara University and several people did correct me that Santa Clara University is in the city of Santa Clara, not in San Jose, proof that I do not know the way to Santa Clara. Bebee reads the names during the commencement ceremony and she goes to great lengths to pronounce each one correctly and some of them are pretty tough.

(Soundbite of archived ALL THINGS CONSIDERED broadcast)

Professor ROSE MARIE BEEBE (Spanish Literature, Santa Clara University): I remember one name that I read in 2001. It was the valedictorian and I definitely practiced that name so much, I was dreaming the name. The student's name was Dana Keali'nuipi'ilaniomaui Creston Wolfe.

SIEGEL: Well, that brought back memories for listener Kate Martin(ph) of Loveland, Colorado. She used to announce the batters at Little League games in Alaska.

Ms. KATE MARTIN (Resident, Loveland, Colorado): One day a girl's mother pulled me aside before a game with a problem - nobody knew how to pronounce her daughter's name. They always just called her Sheena A(ph) or they stumbled over it if she came up to bat. So I practiced for the few minutes that I have before her game. When she came up to bat, I announced it - now batting for Savoonga Little League, Sheena Alaelafayueba(ph). She turned around and flashed me a big smile and then hit a stand up double.

SIEGEL: Well, we want to know what you think of our program - good and bad. Send us comments at our Web site, npr.org. Click on Contact Us at the top of the page.

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