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Norway's Drunken Driving Fines Based On Income

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Norway's Drunken Driving Fines Based On Income

Business

Norway's Drunken Driving Fines Based On Income

Norway's Drunken Driving Fines Based On Income

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When police stopped a 49-year-old businessman, they discovered his blood alcohol level to be well over Norway's legal limit. Citing the man's personal wealth of more than $30 million, a court ordered him to pay $109,000 as a drunken-driving penalty — almost his entire annual income. In Norway, fines are based on income and personal wealth.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's Last Word in Business is Norse code. Not Morse code -with the dots and dashes - Norse code. Norse as in Scandinavian, and in this case we are talking about the drunk-driving code in Norway. It is strict and if you're rich, it's even stricter. That's because drunk-driving fines in Norway are based on income and personal wealth. A few months ago, police stopped a 49-year-old business man. They found his blood-alcohol level to be well over Norway's legal limit of 0.02 percent. Yesterday, a court there cited the man's personal wealth of more than $30 million, and the court ordered him to pay $109,000 as a drunk-driving penalty - almost his entire annual income.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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