Pin Your Memories On Our Map

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On Our Soapbox Blog

Participate in our summer project we're calling "Place and Memory," where we revisit places in our lives that had a particular hold on us but are now long gone.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Our memories help define who we are. Some of these recollections are at places that no longer exist - maybe your grandmother's house or apartment with a faint smell of mildew, now replaced by some McMansion; the dive bar where you saw your first punk band; that quirky restaurant that served everything rabbit.

Unidentified Man: Across from the restaurant was an old softball field. And when we'd know there was going to be a softball game, we would drive up from Birmingham and get a bucket of rabbit livers, sit down on the bleachers and munch away on the rabbit livers. And that was a fantastic way to spend a spring afternoon.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: This summer, WEEKEND EDITION is collaborating with some independent producers to launch the Place and Memory Project. We'll feature stories about places we knew that are now long gone. There will be an online map pinpointing some of these spots, and we'd like your suggestions, photos and reminiscences.

Just go to NPR.org/SoapBox to find out how to share your memory of a place you miss.

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