Shower Breaks May Make Workers More Productive

Employees from various British companies were asked to take shower breaks over a two month period and record how it affected their work. Results indicate productivity increased 42 percent and creativity rose 33 percent. The study was conducted on behalf of a shower manufacturer — perhaps hoping for a deluge of orders for workplace shower installations.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is a shower a day keeps you working away. A British study shows that workers who take daily shower breaks at work may be more productive. Employees from various companies, including an architecture firm and a lingerie company, were asked to take shower breaks over a two-month period and record how it affected their work. Seems productivity increased 42 percent and creativity rose by a third, however they measured that.

One participant said showering offered a few moments of peace and quiet from the ringing of office phones, and it was great for mulling over ideas. Not to pour cold water on the study, but it was conducted on behalf of a shower manufacturer…

(Soundbite of laughter)

MONTAGNE: …who, Steve, perhaps hoping for a deluge of orders for workplace shower installation, a whole new market.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Did you say deluge of orders?

MONTAGNE: Waiting to be tapped.

INSKEEP: Okay.

MONTAGNE: That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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