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'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

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'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

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'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104405089/104517027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Kenny Hendricks was in the first season of Deadliest Catch. After five decades in the fishing business, he now talks to fans who pay to tour the Sea Star. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Martin Kaste/NPR

Kenny Hendricks was in the first season of Deadliest Catch. After five decades in the fishing business, he now talks to fans who pay to tour the Sea Star.

Martin Kaste/NPR

The Sea Star was featured in the Discovery Channel show. In the summers, the fishing vessel is moored at the Fishermen's Terminal in Seattle, and fans pay to take a closer look. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Martin Kaste/NPR

The Sea Star was featured in the Discovery Channel show. In the summers, the fishing vessel is moored at the Fishermen's Terminal in Seattle, and fans pay to take a closer look.

Martin Kaste/NPR

It is well after dawn. The skies are still gray, and deckhand Kenny Hendricks waits patiently for the day's haul to start coming in.

Hendricks found fame during the first season of the Discovery Channel's Deadliest Catch.

The hit reality show, now in its fifth season, chronicles the voyages of crab fishermen in Alaska as they brave the roiling Bering Sea — and the stormy waters of interpersonal conflict. (It is reality television, after all).

But on this day, Hendricks and his colleagues aren't out for crab.

A group of crab fishermen has brought the Sea Star, an old crab boat featured on the show, to Seattle's working fishermen's harbor, put a gift shop on the back deck and gone into business angling for tourists.

Turns out that in the dock, just as on the high seas, bad weather can wreak havoc on the crabbers' business — and the presence of a confident, charismatic captain can make all the difference.

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