DJ Reverses Stance On Waterboarding In 6 Seconds

Conservative radio talk show host Erich "Mancow" Muller decided to try waterboarding Friday to prove it is not torture. Problem: After being waterboarded for about six seconds, he declared the technique "absolute torture."

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JACKI LYDEN, host:

A story now of water, radio and recantation. While the debate over Bush era interrogation techniques was winding down this week, one man decided to take it a step further. He is the Chicago-based syndicated shock jock, Erich "Mancow" Muller, a defender of waterboarding. And yesterday, he set out to silence critics of the technique by having himself waterboarded live on his radio show, of course.

(Soundbite of radio program)

Sergeant CLAY SOUTH(ph): You lay down here.

Mr. ERICH "MANCOW" MULLER (Radio Host): Okay.

Unidentified Man #1: And Mancow is laying down on the table. It's about a seven-foot table. His feet are now on a box. His feet are elevated. His feet are being - what are you doing, sir?

Sgt. SOUTH: I am tying his feet up.

Mr. MULLER: I'm all ready to say uncle. I already hate this. I already hate this.

LYDEN: Standing over the shock jock is Sergeant Clay South, holding a one gallon pitcher of water. Mancow boasted that he could probably withstand the procedure for at least 30 to 60 seconds. According to Sergeant Clay South, the average is 14.

Sgt. SOUTH: We're going to do it on five, okay?

Mr. MULLER: Okay.

Sgt. SOUTH: Okay, one, two, I lied.

(Soundbite of water pouring)

Unidentified Man #1: All right, that's it, that's it. All right.

Mr. MULLER: Oh, god.

Unidentified Man #1: Mancow is soaked.

Mr. MULLER: Oh.

Unidentified Man #1: Mancow is soaked.

LYDEN: Well, he lasted just six seconds. The average is 14. Here he is being interviewed about it by co-host, Pat Cassidy.

Mr. MULLER: It is way worse than I thought it would be, and that's no joke.

Mr. PAT CASSIDY (Radio Host): Would you consider that torture?

Mr. MULLER: Look, all that's been done to this country, and I heard about water being dropped on someone's face, and I never considered it torture. Even when I was laying there, I thought this is going to be no big deal. I go swimming. It's going to be like being in the tub. I do now want to say this: absolutely torture. Absolutely. I mean, that's drowning.

LYDEN: One man's belief that waterboarding is not torture reversed in only six seconds.

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