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MP3 Player May Soon Analyze Listener's Mood
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MP3 Player May Soon Analyze Listener's Mood

Business

MP3 Player May Soon Analyze Listener's Mood

MP3 Player May Soon Analyze Listener's Mood
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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104527835/104527813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Consumer electronics maker Sony-Ericsson has filed a patent for a technology that allows an MP3 player to analyze your mood and come up with a list of suitable songs. The aim of the technology is not to reduce the cost of therapy, but to save you the trouble of coming up with your own playlist.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Handheld musical devices are also getting smarter. Our Last Word In Business today is mood enhancing mp3.

(Soundbite of music)

GREENE: Ah, yes. Consumer electronic maker Sony Ericsson has filed a patent for a technology that allows an mp3 player to analyze your mood and come up with a list of suitable songs like this. This is the one they've chosen for me. Basically, if you're happy and you know it, don't clap your hands. Instead, just stare into the camera of your handheld device and presto, it chooses a list of upbeat songs for you. Well, if you're sad, it'll choose a string of those tearjerkers. The aim of this technology is not to reduce the cost of therapy - no, rather, it has more to do with saving you the trouble of coming up with your own playlist.

(Soundbite of laughter)

GREENE: That is the business news on MORNING EDITION this morning. We're happy to be part of your playlist. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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