Communities And The Mentally Ill

GUESTS: Dr. E. Fuller Torrey *Research psychiatrist *Executive Director of the Stanley Foundation (supports research on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) *Author, Out of the Shadows: Confronting America's Mental Illness Crisis (John Wiley & Sons, 1996), and many other books on mental illness Ira Burnim *Legal Director of the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law John Hinckley, the would-be assassin of Ronald Reagan, was recently granted supervised day visits outside the psychiatric hospital where he has been confined since his conviction. Many in the community are upset that a mentally ill man with violent behaviour in his past will be allowed even a limited degree of freedom. A number of highly publicized incidents involving violent acts by the mentally ill have also led to a call for greater monitoring of psychiatric patients. But advocates of the mentally ill are concerned that the patients' civil rights are in jeopardy. Join Ray Suarez and guests as they discuss how to balance the rights of the community to be safe with the rights of the mentally ill... on the next "Talk of the Nation" from NPR News.

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