NPR logo
Britain Hopes To Repeat Fab Four's Success
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104648056/104648033" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Britain Hopes To Repeat Fab Four's Success

Business

Britain Hopes To Repeat Fab Four's Success

Britain Hopes To Repeat Fab Four's Success
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104648056/104648033" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Britain is hoping to produce another global music phenomenon like the Beatles. The government is nurturing youthful music ambition by setting up free music halls around the country.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Our last word in business today is more Fab Four.

(Soundbite of song, "Ain't She Sweet?")

Mr. JOHN LENNON (Singer, Songwriter, the Beatles): (Singing) Oh, ain't she sweet? See her walking down that street.

GREENE: Britain is hoping to produce another global music phenomenon like the Beatles. The government is nurturing youthful musical ambition by setting up free music halls all around the country.

Mr. FEARGAL SHARKEY (Lead Singer, the Undertones): Completely (unintelligible), with the most extraordinary range of instrumentation, amplification.

(Soundbite of song, "Teenage Kicks")

Mr. SHARKEY: (Singing) I want to hold you, want to hold you tight, get teenage kicks right through the night.

GREENE: That's Feargal Sharkey, folks, doing the speaking and singing there. He's a former punk rocker and lead singer of the Undertones, and he's now working with the government to set up these music halls. He and the government believe that if they can breed new talent and maybe find a new legendary band, it can only be good for the country's economy.

Mr. SHARKEY: There is a segment of British economy that has been consistently growing for the last three or four years, and that is creativity. And we are, for such a small nation, phenomenally good at it.

GREENE: Yes, they are. And the other aim of this project is to keep at-risk kids off the streets. These free community music centers will be located in low-income areas. The first recently opened at the Knotty Ash Center in Liverpool, in the very same building that hosted the Beatles in the 1960s, when they were still dreaming of making it big.

That's the business news here on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.