NPR logo

General Motors' Woes Felt Far South Of Detroit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104699809/104699804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
General Motors' Woes Felt Far South Of Detroit

U.S.

General Motors' Woes Felt Far South Of Detroit

General Motors' Woes Felt Far South Of Detroit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104699809/104699804" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
GM plant in Springfield, Tenn.

A car-transport workman loads 2009 Chevrolet Traverse vehicles at the General Motors Spring Hill Manufacturing Plant in Spring Hill, Tenn. hide caption

toggle caption

General Motors (GM) is expected to file for bankruptcy on Monday, which is the government-imposed deadline for the automotive giant to restructure and slash costs. But there is a looming fear of even more cuts in towns across the nation, where GM is major part of the workforce.

Mayor Michael Dinwiddie of Spring Hill, Tenn., where a GM plant is the town's largest employer, is joined by Blake Farmer of NPR member station WPLN. Farmer covers the automotive industry in Tennessee.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.