New Pew Center Poll

GUESTS: BILL KOVACH Curator, Nieman Foundation at Harvard University Former Editor, Atlanta Journal and Constitution Former Washington Bureau Chief, The New York Times Co-author, Warp Speed: America in the Age of Mixed Media TOM ROSENSTIEL Director, Project for Excellence in Journalism Author, Strange Bedfellows: How Television and The Presidential Candidates Changed American Politics Co-author, Warp Speed: America in the Aged of Mixed Media ANDREW KOHUT Director, Pew Research Center for the People & the Press Founder of Princeton Survey Research Associates Former, President of the Gallup Organization After a year of seemingly non-stop scandal coverage, many Americans are feeling ambivalent about the role of the media in society. Online reporting and the proliferation of 24-hour news channels are rapidly changing the way news is gathered and distributed. The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press has just completed a survey of journalists to gauge their views of current journalistic standards. Join guest host Lynn Neary and a panel of journalists to discuss the Pew survey, the results of which will be announced.

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