Recipes: 'Lobel's Prime Time Grilling'

Southwest-style pork chops i i
Southwest-style pork chops

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These recipes appear in Lobel's Prime Time Grilling: Recipes & Tips from America's #1 Butchers by Stanley, Leon, Evan, Mark, and David Lobel, Chronicle Books 2007.

Southwest-Style Pork Chops with Ancho Chile Powder

Serves 4

 

Loin pork chops are cut from the front of the center loin and have a tasty nugget of tenderloin nestled next to the T-bone. They are juicy and delicious — a favorite for grilling. You could substitute rib pork chops, which are equally tasty but don't have the tenderloin. Beware of this spice rub: It is not for the faint of heart. The salsa cools it down a little, but not completely! If the rub is to your liking, try it on pork loin or spareribs, too.

 

3 tablespoons ancho chile powder (see notes)

1 tablespoon toasted cumin seeds, crushed (see notes)

1 teaspoon toasted coriander seeds, crushed (see notes)

1 teaspoon dry mustard

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

4 loin pork chops, each about 1 1/2 inches thick

Vegetable oil cooking spray

Baja-style tomato salsa (page 233)

 

1. Combine the chile powder, cumin seeds, coriander seeds, and dry mustard in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper, stirring well.

2. Rub the mixture into the meatiest parts of the pork chops and put the chops in a large, shallow glass or ceramic dish. Cover and set aside at room temperature for about 30 minutes, or refrigerate for as long as 8 hours, letting the meat come to room temperature before grilling.

3. Prepare a charcoal or gas grill: Lightly spray the grill rack with vegetable oil cooking spray. Light the coals or heating elements, and let them burn or heat until moderately hot.

4. Grill the chops for 8 to 10 minutes on each side, until a meat thermometer inserted in the center of the meatiest sections registers 150º to 155ºF. Let the chops rest for a few minutes before serving. Serve with the salsa.

Notes: Ancho chile powder is made from ground ancho chiles, which are mildly hot. The powder is generally available in Hispanic and specialty markets. If you cannot find it, substitute any chili powder.

To toast coriander seeds, spread them in a small dry skillet and cook over medium-high heat for about 60 seconds or until fragrant. Shake the pan during toasting to prevent burning. Crush the seeds with the back of a skillet.

Grilled sirloin steak

Grilled Sirloin Steak with Green Chile Sauce

Serves 6

 

In this recipe, note that the chiles for the sauce can be lightly grilled over the fire before you grill the steak. Be sure to have all the other sauce ingredients ready so that you can prepare the chiles and finish the sauce while the steak grills — or as soon as it is lifted from the grill. If you have a gas grill with a gas burner, use it to cook the sauce.

 

Steak:

3 3/4- to 4-pound boneless sirloin, about 2 inches thick

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon crushed cumin seed

1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves

1 clove garlic

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Vegetable oil cooking spray

Sauce:

6 fresh anaheim green chiles

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced crosswise

1 large clove garlic, sliced

1 cup half-and-half

3 tablespoons cream cheese

3 tablespoons sour cream

Salt to taste

1. Trim the outer fat from the steak, or ask the butcher to do so.

2. Rub the entire surface of the meat with the olive oil.

 

Combine the cumin, oregano, thyme, garlic, and salt and pepper in a small bowl. Using your fingers, rub evenly on both sides of the steak and put the steak in a shallow glass or ceramic dish. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or overnight, letting the meat come to room temperature before grilling.

3. To make the sauce, prepare a charcoal or gas grill or preheat the broiler. If using a grill, the coals should be moderately

hot to hot. Set the chiles over the heat or under the broiler and grill or broil for about 5 minutes on each side until lightly charred and fragrant. Remove from the grill or broiler and set aside in a paper bag or cover with a thickness of paper towels to cool. When cool enough to handle, peel the skin using your fingers or a dull knife. (Do not peel the chiles under running water or their flavor will be diluted.) Cut off and discard the stems and caps. Slit the chiles, scrape out the seeds (don't worry if a few remain), and thinly slice the chiles. You will have about 1 cup of chiles.

4. Meanwhile, if you haven't already, prepare a charcoal or gas grill: Lightly spray the grill rack with vegetable oil cooking spray. Light the coals or heating elements, and let them burn or heat until moderately hot to hot.

5. Heat the oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and garlic and cook, stirring, for about 5 minutes, or until the onions are softened. Add the chiles and cook for 3 to 4 minutes longer, until fragrant.

6. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the half-and half. Cook, stirring, for about 10 minutes, or until the sauce is reduced by half. Cover and set aside to keep warm while grilling the steak.

7. Grill the steak for 10 to 12 minutes. Turn and grill for 10 to 12 minutes longer for medium-rare, or until it is cooked to the desired degree of doneness. Let the meat rest for a few minutes before serving.

8. Set the pan with the sauce over low heat. Add the cream cheese and stir until smooth. Stir in the sour cream and season with salt. While stirring, heat the sauce just until hot. Do not let the sauce boil. Serve immediately with the steak.

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