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In Miss., Marker To Remember Civil Rights Workers

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In Miss., Marker To Remember Civil Rights Workers

U.S.

In Miss., Marker To Remember Civil Rights Workers

In Miss., Marker To Remember Civil Rights Workers

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/105685393/105685365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Forty five years ago this Father's Day, three civil rights workers were ambushed and killed by members of the Ku Klux Klan on a small road in Neshoba County, Miss.

The outrage over the murder of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

This weekend, Neshoba County Supervisor Obbie Riley, along with some volunteers, will start the work of installing a memorial marker for the three slain men on Mississippi 19 South, which has been renamed Goodman Chaney Schwerner Memorial Highway.

Riley is working alone because the county said it won't be responsible for installing the marker.

"I would hope that this marker would not cause anyone to stop and read it and for their heart to be filled with anger, but know that this marker is placed near the spot that a major installment on freedom was paved," Riley says.

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