NPR logo Toll Expected To Rise To 9 In DC Metro Trains Crash

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Toll Expected To Rise To 9 In DC Metro Trains Crash

Rescue workers respond to the site of two Metro trains that collided with one another in Washington, i

Rescue workers respond to the site of two Metro trains that collided with one another in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Win McNamee/Getty Images
Rescue workers respond to the site of two Metro trains that collided with one another in Washington,

Rescue workers respond to the site of two Metro trains that collided with one another in Washington, D.C., on Monday.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Emergency officials in Washington, D.C., are investigating the afternoon rush-hour collision of two subway trains in the Northeast section of the city, which killed at least six people.

The accident involved two of the city's Metrorail trains on the subway system's busy Red Line.

Washington, D.C., Mayor Adrian Fenty called it the deadliest accident in Metro's history and said there had been six confirmed deaths. One of those who died was the operator of one of the trains. D.C. fire spokesman Alan Etter described the accident as a "mass casualty event," with an unspecified number of severe injuries.

Metro officials have been quoted as saying they expect the toll to rise to nine dead.

Etter said crews were cutting apart the trains to get people out. Fire department Chief Dennis Rubin described a car-to-car search for victims. Fire and rescue companies from a number of surrounding jurisdictions were on the scene to help in the search.

Jasmine Garsd, who works for the NPR show Tell Me More, was aboard one of the trains involved and described the scene:

"The lights went off. The Metro car filled with smoke. People started panicking because the door wasn't opening and it was filling with smoke. Somebody managed to open the door somehow and people started hopping off the Metro train car."

The collision occurred about 5 p.m. between the Fort Totten and Takoma Park stations, near the Maryland border.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Monday's derailment is the first in more than two years. In January 2007, a subway train on the Green Line derailed near downtown Washington, sending 20 people to the hospital and prompting the rescue of 60 people from a tunnel.

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