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Former Hostage On Protecting Journalists

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Former Hostage On Protecting Journalists

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Former Hostage On Protecting Journalists

Former Hostage On Protecting Journalists

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Reporter Chris Cramer, right, and fellow hostage Sim Harris co-wrote the book Hostage about their experience. Here, the pair are pictured in front the burnt out Iranian embassy in April 1982. Geoff Bruce/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoff Bruce/Getty Images

Reporter Chris Cramer, right, and fellow hostage Sim Harris co-wrote the book Hostage about their experience. Here, the pair are pictured in front the burnt out Iranian embassy in April 1982.

Geoff Bruce/Getty Images

Journalist Chris Cramer knows what it's like to work under pressure. In 1980, while applying up a visa at the Iranian Embassy in London, Cramer was taken hostage by six armed terrorists, who kept him for a day and half.

Cramer's experience as a hostage evolved into an effort to protect and train journalists in hostile conditions. He is president and founding member of the International News Safety Institute, a non-profit charity devoted to the protection and safety of journalists.

Cramer has more than 40 years of experience in international broadcasting, and has worked for the BBC and CNN International.