Honduran Envoy Backs New Government

The Honduran envoy to the U.S. says he has not been notified of a change in his status, though the man who appointed him, Manuel Zelaya, was deposed last weekend by the country's military.

Ambassador Roberto Flores Bermudez's remarks in an interview with Melissa Block came after Rodolfo Pastor, a minister at the Honduran Embassy in Washington, told NPR that the ambassador was no longer the country's envoy.

Flores Bermudez said he was called back to Honduras for consultations with the new government.

Flores Bermudez insists the events in his country were not a coup.

"It's a constitutional procedure to remove from office the president that had been in breach of law."

Zelaya had defied the country's Supreme Court and sought a referendum on a constitutional change that would keep him in power beyond his term, which ends in January 2010.

Flores Bermudez says the change of government in Honduras followed the due process of law and urged the international community to listen to all sides of the issue.

"There is a need for the international community to be able to listen to what actually happened here, not just to listen to one side."

The international community has strongly backed Zelaya. On Wednesday, the Organization of American States gave Honduras 72 hours to reinstate the deposed leader or face expulsion from the group. The Obama administration has backed these efforts.

Zelaya, who is in Washington, had previously said he would seek to return to Honduras on Thursday, but he delayed his return after the OAS ultimatum.

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