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Experimenting with Carbon Sequestration

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Experimenting with Carbon Sequestration

Environment

Experimenting with Carbon Sequestration

Experimenting with Carbon Sequestration

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Billowing smokestack.
iStockPhoto.com

Each year, the world releases more than 25 billion tons of carbon dioxide. Scrubbers exist to strip pollutants such as sulfur from smokestack emissions — could a carbon dioxide scrubber be built to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere and help combat global climate change?

Klaus Lackner, Maurice Ewing and J. Lamar Worzel Professor of Geophysics; professor of earth and environmental sciences; director, Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy, The Earth Institute of Columbia University

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