The Week In 'Song Of The Day'

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros 300

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. courtesy of the artist hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of the artist

Every weekday, NPR Music's self-explanatorily titled series Song of the Day chooses a new piece of music and gives users a chance to play the track, link to the artist's Web sites and read an essay about what makes each one special. That adds up to a lot of songs.

So, to condense the week in songs down to an even more digestible bite, host Guy Raz sat down with Song of the Day editor Stephen Thompson to review his most recent selections.

With five tracks to choose from — including selections by indie-pop singer John Vanderslice ("Too Much Time"), jazz vocalist Kurt Elling (covering the standard "Lush Life"), roots-rock band The Dead Satellites (the protest song "Shook Down") and power-pop group The Starlight Mints ("Paralyzed") — Thompson chose as his favorite "Home," a song by the 10-piece L.A. band Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros.

Click here to subscribe to the Song of the Day newsletter.

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Romanian Names

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Album
Romanian Names
Artist
John Vanderslice
Label
Dead Oceans
Released
2009

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Dedicated to You: Kurt Elling Sings the Music of Coltrane and Hartman

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Album
Dedicated to You: Kurt Elling Sings the Music of Coltrane and Hartman
Artist
Kurt Elling
Label
Concord Jazz
Released
2009

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Change Remains

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Album
Change Remains
Artist
The Starlight Mints
Label
Barsuk
Released
2009

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Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

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Album
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
Artist
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
Released
2009

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