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Covering Iran Without A Press Pass

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Covering Iran Without A Press Pass

Around the Nation

Covering Iran Without A Press Pass

Covering Iran Without A Press Pass

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A female protester in Tehran makes a V sign for victory July 9. Journalist Roger Cohen stayed in Tehran, even after the Iranian government revoked all foreign press passes. Getty Images hide caption

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New York Times journalist Roger Cohen stayed in Iran to cover the post-presidential election protests — even after the Iranian government revoked all foreign press passes.

Cohen gives an eyewitness account of the attacks against demonstrators in the wake of the June election. He also talks about how the situation will affect President Obama's ability to open relations with Iran.

Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times and the author of Hearts Grown Brutal: Sagas of Sarajevo and Soldiers and Slaves: American POWs Trapped by the Nazis' Final Gamble.