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Letters: Brown, Michigan

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Letters: Brown, Michigan

From Our Listeners

Letters: Brown, Michigan

Letters: Brown, Michigan

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Listeners responded to the interview with Willie Brown and the conversation with Michigan state Rep. Michael Lahti. Madeleine Brand and Robert Siegel read from listeners' e-mails.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Madeleine Brand.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

And I'm Robert Siegel. In a moment, your letters. But first, this one correction. Yesterday, some of you may have heard a reporter on our program identify the Supreme Court nominee as Sandra Sotomayor. Of course, her name is Sonia.

BRAND: In your letters some of you were grateful for our interview with this California character.

Former Mayor WILLIE BROWN (San Francisco, California): I am Willie Brown. I am formerly the mayor of San Francisco and formerly the speaker of the California State Assembly for 15 years.

BRAND: Thank you for your interview of Willie Brown, writes Al Folker(ph) of Menlo Park, California. He is an authentic San Francisco character and very underrated as one of the shrewdest politicians in the history of California.

Mr. Folker continues: I have run into him several times recently in the city, and he really does enjoy every moment of every day. He is also the most approachable public figure I've ever met and is always ready with a sly and intuitive insight on current events, politics and the social scene.

SIEGEL: Well, Manny Poppendreas(ph) of Indianapolis was also thankful but for a different reason. He writes: I found your interview with Willie Brown yesterday most enlightening. It was a rare peek into the mind of a very powerful person. He seemed to be saying that if only he were still in power and could simply impose more taxes on the populace, there would be no problem in California. I was blown away by his arrogance and disdain for the people that he was supposed to be representing.

BRAND: In other state politics, we talked yesterday with Michigan state Representative Michael Lahti. He calls himself a Yooper. You can, too. He represents part of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The U.P. is the section that isn't the well-known mitten shape of most of Michigan.

Representative Lahti is sponsoring legislation that requires any picture of the state produced by the state to include the U.P.

SIEGEL: Well, Jeff Curry(ph) of Pullman, Washington, writes this: As a native Yooper and former resident of Representative Lahti's hometown, it's always great to hear about the Upper Peninsula in a national media. I can't tell you how many times I have noticed the U.P. missing from maps, drawn incorrectly or lumped in with Wisconsin, no offense to Wisconsin, obviously.

Mr. Curry goes on: I know several people with tattoos of the Upper Peninsula but nobody with a tattoo of the Lower Peninsula.

BRAND: Well, keep those letters coming. Please write to us by going to npr.org and clicking on contact us.

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