Engineer Convicted Of Stealing Trade Secrets

A Chinese-American engineer has been found guilty of stealing trade secrets for China. Dongfan "Greg" Chung, 73, is the first person convicted under a 1996 economic espionage law, which cracked down on the theft of information from private companies that work with the government on space and military technologies. Investigators found hundreds of thousands of pages of sensitive documents stacked up in his home.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with a conviction for economic espionage.

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INSKEEP: A 73-year-old Chinese-American engineer was found guilty yesterday of stealing trade secrets for China. Dongfan Greg Chung is the first person convicted under a 1996 economic espionage law. It's aimed at cracking down on the theft of information from private companies that work with the government on space and military technology. Mr. Chung worked at Rockwell International, then Boeing for nearly 40 years, and was arrested in February 2008. Investigators found hundreds of thousands of pages of sensitive documents stacked in his home. Some of those documents had information about a fueling system for a booster rocket. Defense attorneys say their client was a pack rat, not a spy. But Chung faces more than 70 years in prison.

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