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Farmer Turns Onion Waste Into Energy

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Farmer Turns Onion Waste Into Energy

Business

Farmer Turns Onion Waste Into Energy

Farmer Turns Onion Waste Into Energy

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Steve Gill grows onions throughout California and processes them at a facility in Oxnard. Gill was tired of disposing of all that pungent waste. The Los Angeles Times reports he invested in a system that turns the onion leftovers into energy. Juice from the onion leftovers now powers the refrigerators and lighting at his Oxnard plant.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is also about a business trying to go green. The last word is onion power. The LA Times has a story about Steve Gill, a farmer who grows onions in farms throughout California and processes them at a facility in Oxnard. Mr. Gill was tired of disposing of all that pungent waste. So he invested in a system that turns the onion leftovers into energy. Juice from those onion leftovers is fermented, converted into methane, and then this delicious-sounding cocktail powers the refrigerators and lighting at his plant. Gill saves hundreds of thousands of dollars per year in disposal and energy costs. And of course he has reduced his carbon footprint.

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