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The Most Common Consonants, In Any Order

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The Most Common Consonants, In Any Order

The Most Common Consonants, In Any Order

The Most Common Consonants, In Any Order

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106774188/106783626" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

  

On-Air Challenge

Three of the most common consonants of the English language are R, S and T. Every answer today is a word, name or phrase that contains each of the letters R, S and T exactly once, along with any number of vowels. For example, if the clue is "short-winded," the answer would be, "terse." Note: The R, S and T can appear in any order.

Last Week's Challenge

It comes from listener Ben Bass of Chicago. A few weeks ago, we had a puzzle that asked you to write the name KEVIN KLINE, pointing out that when it is written in capital letters, each name consists of 13 straight lines, with no curves. We asked you to name another celebrity whose first and last names also have five letters in which each name consists of 14 straight lines. The answer was VANNA WHITE. Last week's challenge was: Name a genre of music in two five-letter words, each word consisting of exactly 15 straight lines and no curves.

Answer: HEAVY METAL

Winner: David Winters of Gloversville, N.Y.

Next Week's Challenge

Think of a word starting with G and ending in R. Remove the G and R, and the remaining letters can be rearranged to spell a synonym of the original word. What words are these?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m.

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